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Improving Business Process Performance Gain Agility Create Value And Achieve Success

Specifically, Carlsberg analyzed their business processes, discovered inefficiencies, and used BPM software to digitalize their inventory management and ordering processes. These changes meant that:. The results Carlsberg saw from their BPM initiatives are great. Nearly every business—from the biggest corporations to tiny startups—can benefit from BPM. The team here at Novacura have been helping businesses achieve BPM success for over 14 years. BPM is a group of principles, methods and tools to design, analyze, execute and track business processes with the goal of getting more value out of them.

This value might be internal—better efficiency, higher quality products, faster shipping times—or it might be customer value better service, faster reply times, etc. The official definition of BPM, according to bpm. In simple terms, business process management is the steps you take to make your business processes better. You do this by:. So in other words: business process management is the art and science of making sure everything in your company works as well as it possibly can—and provides you with as much value as it possibly can, too.

A business process is the way you deliver a product or service to your customers. Business processes provide structure and help you create repeatable, executable tasks. To put it another way: your business is made up of tasks, information, people, data and materials. A business process is the way these things interact with each other to reach a goal: build a unit of a product, complete an order, service a customer, close out the year-end budget, or whatever else you need to do to make your business run.

But it can also be quite large and detailed, involving multiple people and departments—like the process to manufacture a car. They are the way you do what you do. Some companies, like Amazon , have even patented their business processes as intellectual property. You invest a lot of money and effort to get the best machines and keep them running in tip-top shape. The same should go for your business processes.

Enter Business Agility

Your business—and every other business—run on a series of business processes. Sometimes those processes work really well. Sure, they might work in the sense that they get done. If it sounds like BPM is something your company needs, great! Most—if not all—businesses can benefit from BPM. But in order for your BPM efforts to be successful, you need company buy-in. So, what can you say to your boss and colleagues to get them on board with BPM?

BPM is all about finding and removing inefficiencies. Removing pointless, repetitive work—like, for example, uploading the same data into 3 different places—frees up time for employees to focus on the work that actually creates value for your company.

Raynus, Joseph.

How much time could your company save? Traceability is a big topic these days. There are food recalls due to illness , product recalls because of safety concerns , and so on. Governments and industry regulators are demanding more information about your products, at every stage of the supply chain. The world moves faster now. Customers constantly demand higher quality and faster service for the same price. In order to meet these demands, your business needs to be flexible and adaptable.

Improving Business Process Performance: Gain Agility, Create Value, and Achieve Success (ebook)

Increasing productivity and removing inefficiencies makes things run smoother and faster, which leads to bigger profits with less effort. In short: a strong BPM program can help your business be more productive, maximize profits, and reduce waste at the same time.


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It also requires a lot of planning, communication and education. Sometimes there can be push-back on BPM efforts. BPM can mean big changes to the way people do their jobs, and some people might be content with the status quo. If your company culture is more reactive than proactive, getting buy-in for a BPM project might be hard. According to Gartner , there are 6 phases of BPM maturity. Gartner also says that the majority of business, right now, are in phase 2. The goal is to uncover the root cause of operational issues. This usually starts by identifying and mapping the most important business processes, then analyzing those processes.